supreme court

Justice Sotomayor Pays a Visit to Washington University

Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor participated in a public discussion with Chancellor Andrew Martin on April 5. (Zoe Oppenheimer/Student Life)

and | Managing Scene Editor, Staff Writer

Our rights are in danger: Why I’m scared of Barrett’s nomination

This is terrifying. I cannot overstate the amount of fear that Thursday’s vote inspires in me—more, somehow, than Justice Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings in 2018.

| Senior Editor

WU law professor on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s legacy and what her death means for the Supreme Court

To reflect on Justice Ginsburg’s legacy and the near future of the Court, Student Life called Lee Epstein, Washington University’s Ethan A.H. Shepley Distinguished University Professor. Epstein is a political scientist whose research has focused on legal institutions and the behavior of judges.

| Associate Editor

Staff editorial: Let Kavanaugh be a wake up call

It hurts to feel ignored, and it hurts even more to feel ignored and not have the ability to do anything about it. Even though as voters, we may not have the ability to directly influence Supreme Court decisions, there are other ways to fight for what we believe in.

Stop asking if Brett Kavanaugh should be held accountable for his actions

When Christine Blasey Ford came forward Sept. 16, one question seemed to rise to national prominence along with her: Should people be held accountable for mistakes they made years ago?

Ali Gold | Staff Writer

Disproving Republican rhetoric around Supreme Court nominations

This past Saturday, the Supreme Court lost its longest-serving and most illustrious member. Justice Antonin Scalia was a legendary conservative known for his wit, strict interpretation of the law, resistance to progressive actions and scathing dissents.

| Staff Writer

Rallying on the right side of history

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court concluded two days of courtroom debate on two landmark cases in gay rights, Hollingsworth v. Perry (the challenge to California’s Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriage in the state) and United States v. Windsor (the challenge to the Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman).

Affirmative action still needed in America

The national discourse on affirmative action is fanatically negative or intellectually inert or both. The latest iteration of the debate stems from University of Texas-Austin’s denial of admission to Abigail Fisher in 2008. UT has a “top ten percent” admissions guarantee—the college admits students from the top ten percent of every high school that ranks […]

What the court couldn’t do

In a unanimous decision on Tuesday, the Supreme Court made one of its biggest rulings in recent history regarding Americans’ right to privacy. In the case of United States v.

| Forum Columnist

Privacy, only at home

This week, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for the case of United States v. Jones. The case deals with the legality of law enforcement officials using GPS tracking devices on American citizens.

| Staff Columnist

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