race

AAVE and learning to speak like yourself

Because I was Black, I thought using AAVE was fine. I had as much a claim to these words as anyone else. But that wasn’t my voice.

| Senior Forum Editor

Unpacking the true meaning of ‘white basketball’

It’s hard to ward off the feeling that “white basketball” is the manifestation of the same racial categorizations that kept black players from playing quarterback in the NFL. 

| Senior Sports Editor

Why I don’t want increased policing on or near campus

Sure, these people are meant to protect civilians, but what do you do when you fear those who are supposed to protect you?

| Staff Writer

WU-SLam poets perform in first scored event of the year

From goth culture to police brutality, spousal abuse, anxiety and saving the planet by falling in love, WU-SLam poets immortalized experiences and circumstance in spoken word this past Friday; the lighthearted and the severe, the mundane and the momentous. This event was the first scored slam of the year put on by WU-SLam.

Ellie Ito | Contributing Writer

Letter from the editor

The decision to capitalize Black comes from the expertise and advocacy of academics, activists and linguists. Black is not purely a descriptor, but an identity group as well.

| Editor-in-Chief

WU to launch Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity & Equity

Washington University will establish a Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity & Equity in fall 2019.

In an announcement during the fifth annual “Day of Discovery, Dialogue & Action,” Chancellor-elect Andrew Martin announced the launch of a university-wide center, which will promote interdisciplinary research on race and ethnicity.

| Staff Reporter

Invisible on campus: Dialogues on diversity, activism and the future of campus inclusion

A look at the rhetoric surrounding dialogue on diversity, changing strategies in activism and remaining challenges the University faces.

and | Senior Editors

Invisible on campus: The slow progress and campus-wide frustration of recruiting black faculty

Wash. U. boasts a number of black administrators, but that diversity hasn’t extended to the faculty ranks, and University officials pointed to these numbers as the hardest to change.

| Longform Editor

Invisible on campus: Boosting black representation through undergraduate admissions

Ask administrators about Wash. U.’ history of recruiting black students, and they’ll say that attempts to diversify the undergraduate population aren’t new. “We’ve been focused on it for a really long time,” Julie Shimabukuro, the Japanese-American director of admissions, said. “Wash. U.’s my alma mater, so this is a really important thing to me personally and to our office.” But the numbers don’t bear out tangible results from that focus.

| Senior Editor

Invisible on campus: The history and impact of black activism on campus

Washington University’s early history with racial integration was a rocky one. In the late 1800s, with the onset of Jim Crow segregation throughout the nation, institutions like Wash. U. that had previously accepted black students, however infrequently, completely barred their doors to them.

| Associate Editor

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