Architectural renderings give glimpse into construction project

| Editor-in-Chief

Seven new individual projects will soon take root on the East End of campus, and administrators are highlighting the connectedness of the largest expansion the Danforth Campus has ever seen.

New renderings of the East End expansion are giving students, faculty and even the board of trustees a glimpse at what the project will materialize into when completed in May 2019.

 A visual rendering of the proposed East End expansion, consisting of seven news buildings that are set to begin construction in May 2017. The project emphasizes open space and the connectedness of the Danforth Campus.Courtesy of the Office of Public Affairs


A visual rendering of the proposed East End expansion, consisting of seven news buildings that are set to begin construction in May 2017. The project emphasizes open space and the connectedness of the Danforth Campus.

The project, first announced last October, will add four new buildings, an underground parking garage, a new central green space and include an expansion of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.

When construction begins following convocation in May 2017, the first step will be excavation, according to Washington University architect Jamie Kolker. While each of the projects has been contracted out to various architects, Kolker said he’s tasked with being the middleman between all the people involved in the project—and those that it will impact.

The two academic buildings, Weil Hall and Jubel Hall, will be connected by an open green space called the “central green.” Weil will house the graduate program in art and architecture, while Jubel will be home to the department of mechanical engineering and materials science. Now mainly a parking lot, Kolker said the central green area will offer a variety of uses.

“The central green is meant [for] two things. It has nice views of the buildings—a view of Brookings from the east, a view of the new buildings, but also provide a place for activity to happen within so it’s ceremonial and visual as well as wanting it to be active and used whether it’s for frisbees or laying on the lawn or sitting on the benches,” Kolker said.

The two sides of the East End—engineering and art and architecture—will also be connected through an underground parking lot.

“Right now it’s filled with barriers, whether it’s cars or there’s no sidewalks or a parking lot,” Kolker added. “This will just make it absolutely connected both on the surface and also through the garage.”

Additionally, the Kemper Museum will be expanded to have an entry to face the landscape and to add a third gallery.

The Sumers Welcome Center will also be housed on the East End and will house admissions and student financial services, both of which will move from their current location in Brookings Hall. Kolker said that as of now they are unsure what will fill the empty space in Brookings.

Lastly, “the Hub”—which Kolker said is only a working name for the space—will house a dining area, the environmental studies academic program and the Office of Sustainability.

“[It’s] really meant to be that magnet of supporting and creating community for all of the users down at the East End,” Kolker said. “We hope engineers and architects and Arts & Sciences students as well as visitors would all be using the food service there and help have a diverse community of different users.”

Additional reporting by Ella Chochrek.

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