Annual Vagina Monologues production attracts hundreds

| News Editor

The cast and crew of the Vagina Monologues show their V-Day pride. The performance raised money for V-Day, an organization that seeks to raise awareness and combat violence against women across the globe.

The cast and crew of the Vagina Monologues show their V-Day pride. The performance raised money for V-Day, an organization that seeks to raise awareness and combat violence against women across the globe.

Students discussed the particulars of sexual moans and enumerated all the different ways to refer to a woman’s vagina at the Washington University production of “The Vagina Monologues” this past weekend.

The show brought hundreds of students and members of the community to Graham Chapel on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The show was based off more than 200 interviews about women’s opinions on sex, relationships and violence against women.

The 90-minute show featured about 20 monologues with one or more actresses in each, based on interviews that were done with women of all ages, ethnicities and occupations. It aimed to empower women in regard to their sexuality.

Each of the monologues in the play addressed a different topic. One, featuring a “Vagina Happy Fact” gave facts about the clitoris, and another gave a six-year-old’s response to questions the interviewer asked her about her vagina: What would it wear? What would it say? What would it look like?

Some monologues told stories. One was based on an old woman who finally chose to look at her vagina after many years, some told of lesbian encounters and others discussed relationships between women and men.

Co-producer, senior Daryl Steiger said that about 800 people in total came to see the show.

“We usually get a larger crowd on Friday and Saturday because people don’t have work,” Steiger said.

Although Friday’s show conflicted with the WU-SLam Grand Slam, people began arriving half an hour before the show, and even the top balcony was full by the time the show began.

The show was produced by Wash. U. V-Day, a student organization committed to minimizing violence against women and girls.

All of the show’s proceeds go to charity, with 10 percent going to the national V-Day organization, which hosts a spotlight campaign every year about women resisting violence in a certain place in the globe. This year the focus is on Haiti.

The rest will go to Planned Parenthood in the St. Louis Region.

“This year we chose Planned Parenthood in the St. Louis region because the issue of maternity is important to the cast and to us, especially because Planned Parenthood provides such important health care to women and teens,” Steiger said.

“They are one of the only programs that provide sexual education to students,” freshman Chelsea Whitaker, who read the monologue “The Little Coochie Snorcher That Could,” said.

Both Steiger and Whitaker said that the show was successful.

“Saturday was the most impactful night; there were a lot of people who were energized. Everything clicked,” Whitaker said.

“[This year] was a huge success,” Steiger said. “We were extremely proud of the production and thought it went off so well. We were very, very happy.”

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