Graham Chapel bells irk students

| Staff Reporter

The Chapel bells are ringing, but there’s no wedding here.

Since the beginning of the semester, the Graham Chapel bells have been sounding every 15 minutes, and students have taken notice.

In the past few years, the bells have rung once an hour on the hour. However, after Washington University did construction on the chapel over the summer, school officials made the decision to ring the bells more frequently in order to bring more attention to the campus landmark.

Years ago, the bells rang every 15 minutes.

Once construction on the chapel finished, an administrator proposed the idea of ringing the church bells more frequently, and the University decided to implement it, according to Amanda Hursey, an event coordinator for the Danforth University Center and Event Management Office.

The bells now ring every 15 minutes, playing a part of their traditional melody. On the hour, the entire tune plays.

Some students voiced frustration at the frequent disruption.

“They are definitely an unnecessary distraction, especially because it’s so close to the library,” sophomore Madeleine Parker said. “I just don’t see what purpose they serve.”

Others students also fail to understand the purpose of ringing the bells every 15 minutes rather than on the hour.

“It’s just stupid because everyone has a watch or their phone to tell the time anyways,” sophomore Michael Bild said.

Despite mostly negative reactions from students, Hursey’s office has not received any direct complaints about the change in the bell schedule.

“We’ve had all positive feedback from faculty and staff, especially in the first few weeks of summer,” Hursey said.

She said that she thinks the bells give campus a more collegiate atmosphere.

The change is most likely permanent, according to Hursey.

“The chapel is such a beautiful gem on campus,” she said. “We wanted to showcase it a little better.”

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