Report shows that women earn less than men at WU

| News Editor

In every model, the gender coefficient was negative, indicating that after controlling for discipline group, rank and experience level, women on average are paid less than men in all schools on the Danforth Campus. The data were analyzed using a logarithmic model to obtain a linear regression. This may introduce a level of distortion. All data are presented as reported in the Danforth Campus Gender Pay Equity Report, May 2010.

In every model, the gender coefficient was negative, indicating that after controlling for discipline group, rank and experience level, women on average are paid less than men in all schools on the Danforth Campus. The data were analyzed using a logarithmic model to obtain a linear regression. This may introduce a level of distortion. All data are presented as reported in the Danforth Campus Gender Pay Equity Report, May 2010.

According to a May, 2010 report, female professors at Washington University are paid less than their male counterparts.

The Danforth Campus Gender Pay Equity Report, May 2010, which analyzed the 2008-2009 salary information of both tenured and tenure-track faculty, concluded that female professors make less than male professors across every school located on main campus.

A separate report released in July concluded that female professors at the Washington University School of Medicine also earn less, on average, than their male counterparts.

The University is now working to ameliorate this inconsistency, according to Ann Prenatt, the University’s Vice Chancellor for Human Resources.

“The compensation gap that is described does need to be corrected,” Prenatt wrote in an email to Student Life.

According to Prenatt, Provost Edward S. Macias is working with the deans of each school to bridge the salary gap.

“Each of the deans is well aware of the data,” said Shelley Milligan, associate provost. “There has been good progress made with that.”

The report for the Danforth Campus breaks down faculty pay by department and level of professorship.

The report also shows that among the university’s 635 professors, only 177 are women.

In the medical school, 357 of 1289 professors are female.

The study used a number of models to analyze the data. Each model showed that on average, female professors earn less than their male counterparts.

The variable of rank was not controlled for in all models. Higher ranked professors earn more than lower ranked professors.

Many students expected there to be little correlation between salary and gender.

“I think it should be equal for both genders,” senior Alice Gu said. “I am surprised in the sense that Wash. U. is such a liberal campus. I thought they would have adjusted.”

Still, others do not find the report surprising.

“Women tend to make less in most professions,” senior Elizabeth Klein said.

Members of the University community hope that the information from the report will serve as an impetus for change.

“The deans want to address this issue—they paid a lot of attention to the report and want to address the issue it raises,” Macias said. “We take it very seriously. We will try to get pay equity.”

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