Shared vocabulary: The first step toward progress

Because facts are constantly under attack, it is important that we all have a shared basis of understanding and agreement on what the words we say actually mean.

Matthew Wallace | Staff Writer

Should you punch a Nazi?

After a televised assault on white nationalist leader Richard Spencer, social media users, pundits and ethicists are all asking the same question: Is it OK to punch a Nazi?

Jen McLish | Contributing Writer

Comedian, CNN host talks about race through humor in CS40 speech

College Hall was almost entirely filled as W. Kamau Bell, a socio-political comedian and host of CNN’s “United Shades of America,” delivered a talk on racism Wednesday night. Right away, Bell warned the audience that the talk was not going to be comfortable or filled with race buzzwords.

| Contributing Reporter

Op-ed submission: More than Black & White

It goes without being said that I was not surprised when I received a text message featuring an image of two female Asian students sporting modern variations of Black face with the caption, “We’re in the zulu (sic) tribe.”

Morgan Bryant | Class of 2019

Fighting misrepresentation begins with students, not the administration

Understandably so, the photo stuck a nerve amongst members of the Wash. U. community. The insensitivity displayed by the two girls shocked and angered many, while others called for action from University administrators.

Social media deepens divide

A Snapchat depicting two sophomore Asian-American students was met with criticism from members of the Washington University community and beyond this weekend. A Facebook post by sophomore Morgan Bryant on Saturday prompted the initial response, as Bryant, who is black, described her reaction to the photo.

| Breaking News Editor

Bear’s Den interrupted

In response to the latest nationwide string of instances of police brutality, a group of over 40 black Washington University students occupied and effectively shut down Bear’s Den Friday evening. Protestors organized in an effort to vocalize concerns with the University’s lack of response to such instances—as well as feelings of invisibility in the Washington University community.

| Staff Reporter

Invisible on campus: Dialogues on diversity, activism and the future of campus inclusion

A look at the rhetoric surrounding dialogue on diversity, changing strategies in activism and remaining challenges the University faces.

and | Senior Editors

Invisible on campus: The slow progress and campus-wide frustration of recruiting black faculty

Wash. U. boasts a number of black administrators, but that diversity hasn’t extended to the faculty ranks, and University officials pointed to these numbers as the hardest to change.

| Longform Editor

Invisible on campus: Boosting black representation through undergraduate admissions

Ask administrators about Wash. U.’ history of recruiting black students, and they’ll say that attempts to diversify the undergraduate population aren’t new. “We’ve been focused on it for a really long time,” Julie Shimabukuro, the Japanese-American director of admissions, said. “Wash. U.’s my alma mater, so this is a really important thing to me personally and to our office.” But the numbers don’t bear out tangible results from that focus.

| Senior Editor