They’ve got Seoul

A review of the new Seoul Taco

| Contributing Reporter

Since expanding from a food truck to a sit-down restaurant in 2012, Seoul Taco has become a staple in many Washington University students’ diets. Given its success, it comes as little surprise that the restaurant has upgraded to a bigger, better location.

Seoul Taco wisely chose to remain close to its original location on the Delmar Loop, a popular spot for students and locals alike, and moved down the street from its original location to 6665 Delmar Blvd. Customers familiar with the old, cramped Seoul Taco know that the restaurant housed little room to move, especially during peak times when it was teeming with people.

Seoul Taco, formerly located on Melville Avenue between Greenway apartments and the Delmar Loop, has moved to a location across the street on Delmar Boulevard. The new, bigger space provides additional seating for customers at the Koran-Mexican fusion restaurant. Stephen Huber | Student Life

Seoul Taco, formerly located on Melville Avenue between Greenway apartments and the Delmar Loop, has moved to a location across the street on Delmar Boulevard. The new, bigger space provides additional seating for customers at the Koran-Mexican fusion restaurant.

With the new space’s large booths and spread-out tables, however, discomfort is no longer an issue. Now in a long room, the line will no longer extend outside the door. There’s even a huge bathroom in the back.

“I think that the ambience here is great. I love that we can sit down for a while and enjoy our Gogi Bowls, which is my favorite dish. It’s really impressive,” sophomore Roohi Byakod said.

Along with the extra legroom, the interior design of the new location deserves plenty of praise. The room is primarily industrial in its design. Embracing the Korean-Mexican harmony characteristic of the food, the walls are covered with a blend of cultural symbols, including taekwondo warriors wearing luchador masks, yin-yang symbols, Korean writing, brightly colored stereos and graffiti. As a reminder of Seoul Taco’s beginnings, parts of the original food truck have been attached to one wall to complement the colorful, vibrant decorations.

The same popular dishes remain on the simple-but-strong menu. The restaurant offers unique and reasonably priced dining in its signature Korean-Mexican fusion-style. With a choice of bulgogi (beef), chicken or pork, all marinated to perfection, it’s hard to go wrong.

The bright orange Seoul sauce is liberally drizzled over the food, giving the quesadillas, tacos and burritos their tangy, delicious taste. Hot white rice, spicy gochujang sauce and a signature fried egg top off the Gogi Bowl with seriously satisfying flavor. The sides are all standouts in their own rights, whether you’re in the mood for some hearty pot stickers or are willing to branch out and try traditional kimchi—a super-spicy fermented cabbage dish.

Seoul Taco serves steak tacos among other unique fusion dishes. The restaurant initially moved from a popular food truck to its sit-down Melville location in 2012, and it has further plans to expand with the opening of Seoul Q, a barbecue restaurant, in the other half of the new location next week.Stephen Huber | Student Life

Seoul Taco serves steak tacos among other unique fusion dishes. The restaurant initially moved from a popular food truck to its sit-down Melville location in 2012, and it has further plans to expand with the opening of Seoul Q, a barbecue restaurant, in the other half of the new location next week.

The vibrant new location has already attracted the attention of Loop frequenters who may have overlooked the small spot before. Marvin Bell, an employee, said that since moving to the new space, the restaurant has had “so much new business…I love interacting with so many new people.”

Come Jan. 19, fans of Seoul Taco can look forward to the opening of a new sister restaurant, Seoul Q. Seoul Taco already shares the space with Seoul Q, which occupies the other half of the location. “Seoul Q is more a barbecue joint…we bring your meat out and you cook it yourself, similar to hibachi,” Bell said.

Sophomore Rachel Partridge, a current fan of Seoul Taco, said she is “excited to try the new style at Seoul Q.”

“If I had one complaint, it would be that this place does not accept Bear Bucks,” Partridge said, with respect to the whole Seoul enterprise.

Besides that minor flaw, this loyal customer can say that she has put her heart and Seoul into this establishment and recommends you do the same.