7 new AEDs installed

| Staff Reporter

The University installed seven automatic external defibrillators in various high traffic locations across campus last week, including this one in the Danforth University Center.Matt Lanter | Student Life

The University installed seven automatic external defibrillators in various high traffic locations across campus last week, including this one in the Danforth University Center.


The University installed seven automatic external defibrillators in various high traffic locations across campus last week.

An automatic external defibrillator (AED) is a portable electronic device that can assess potentially life threatening heart problems and re-establish a regular heartbeat through an electric shock.

The AEDs have been placed in the Danforth University Center (DUC), Mallinckrodt Center, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Olin Library, South 40 House, Village House and Whittemore House. They are in clearly marked metal cabinets with glass windows.

“[The] South 40 House has the largest dining facility on campus along with a fitness center where emergencies can occur,” said Mark Bagby, the emergency management coordinator.

According to Leslie Heusted, the director of the DUC, an AED was installed in the DUC because the building is open 19 hours a day and is so large.

Bagby does not anticipate all buildings on campus receiving an AED. They have already been installed in the Athletic Complex, Simon Hall, Knight Center and on North Campus and West Campus.

The AEDs are funded through the emergency management department, and each unit costs approximately $1,700.

“The funding we are given this year is enough for seven new AEDs and the training for two personnel for each location,” Bagby said.

The University started installing AEDs on campus four years ago and has been adding more as funding becomes available.

Emergency management services proposed putting an AED in every building, which was denied. The medical school also tried appealing for funding for an AED on every floor of all of their buildings, but only received one in each building.

Both the Emergency Support Team and the Washington University Police Department have AEDs as well.

There are currently no plans to install AEDs at off-campus areas.

Some locations, such as the DUC, are allocating their own funds to enroll more employees in the AED training program. The Career Center, Community Service Office and Graduate Student Center each have one employee participating in training. Four additional DUC employees will be trained in addition to the two mandatory employees.

Heusted hopes that by ensuring that each major office in the DUC has at least one trained employee, so that the availability of trained staff to operate the AED at times of emergency will be increased.