WU student-run Premier STL sells over 1,100 tickets to event, looks to expand social scene for college students

Zachary Berman | Contributing Reporter

Premier STL, a student business operated by both Washington University and Saint Louis University students, held its largest event yet on Aug. 31.

For the 18 and up event, held at Ballpark Village in downtown St. Louis, Premier STL sold over 1,100 tickets—a record for the student entrepreneurs in charge of the venture. Washington University sophomore Zach Moskow, founder of Premier STL, is stunned by the company’s growth since its creation in January.

Busch Stadium,is located in downtown St. Louis, in the Ballpark Village neighborhood. For a recent event held in Ballpark Village, student-run event company Premier STL sold over 1,100 18+ tickets to St. Louis-area college students.Stephanie Spera | Student Life

Busch Stadium,is located in downtown St. Louis, in the Ballpark Village neighborhood. For a recent event held in Ballpark Village, student-run event company Premier STL sold over 1,100 18+ tickets to St. Louis-area college students.

“We grew like crazy. The [Facebook] page started growing and growing and we started seeing ticket sales [for Thursday night’s event] growing a lot,” Moskow said. “The majority of the tickets came in the last five or six days. We couldn’t have predicted how many people were coming.”

Moskow founded Premier STL after noticing St. Louis area college students complaining about potentially dangerous nightlife scenes, mainly in fraternity house basements and at local clubs. With Premier STL, Moskow sought to create a safer environment, where 18 and up college students did not have to worry about underage drinking, using fake IDs or high entrance fees, but could still enjoy the St. Louis nightlife scene.

“We’re really big on bringing together different people from different backgrounds together—not just from one school or type of person who goes out. We are very open to who comes to our events and don’t discriminate,” Moskow said.

Premier STL’s mission statement highlights the organization’s emphasis on diversity and inclusion in the party scene.

“Our goal is to have a unified nightlife experience in order to enrich the traditional going out experience and to include a diverse group of people in our social spheres,” the online statement reads. “Premier events serve as a place where students of all genders and backgrounds can come together for a night to have fun and take a break from school.”

The Ballpark Village event marked a turning point for Premier STL, showing Moskow and other staff members just how high the demand is for there events. Moskow noted that about 1,100 18+ tickets were sold, while only 130 of the purchased tickets were for 21+.

“It’s clear that the demand is for 18+ tickets and to not risk using a fake ID, which we strongly discourage,” Moskow said.

At Premier STL events, there is some drinking, which Moskow thinks is inevitable for a college social event. However, the company’s main focus is not on alcohol.

“[Premier events are a] really good way for people to mingle and go with friends to listen to live DJs. We are not reinventing the wheel, just updating it and making it what people want. It’s just a different kind of culture that we create. It’s safer for the people there,” Moskow said.

Sophomore Tony Lee, who recently became involved with the business, said that there is still room for Premier STL to continue to grow but added that he is overall optimistic about the future of the business.

“The event took a lot of moving parts and a lot of collective effort from every team member at Wash. U. and [Saint Louis University]. We’re still learning and still growing,” Lee said. “There’s a lot of good things that happened and a lot of issues that the last event brought that we need to find ways to improve on, but overall, I am excited to see where this company goes.”

The Ballpark Village event highlighted the need for a staff, according to both Moskow and Lee. Last semester, Premier STL hosted smaller events, but never one to this extent. Both sophomores are excited to grow their business and increase its visibility.

“It’s become a real community and a team effort,” Moskow said. “We are really building a brand and a strong team network. It’s about the people working alongside me.”