Students move into Everly on the Loop despite controversy

| News Editor

Washington University students began to move in to Everly on the Loop, a new luxury housing development, as early as August 15—despite its controversial construction on Delmar Loop.

With a 2.9 star rating on Everly’s Facebook web page, the housing development has received an influx of complaints about its high-priced, upscale apartments. Many reviewers, including some Washington University students and alumni, have gone so far as to claim that the Everly’s existence accelerates gentrification on the Loop.

Flags advertising Everly on the Loop fly outside the complex, located on the north side of the Delmar Loop. Washington University students moved into the apartments beginning Aug. 1.Aaron Brezel | Student Life

Flags advertising Everly on the Loop fly outside the complex, located on the north side of the Delmar Loop. Washington University students moved into the apartments beginning Aug. 1.

But regardless of the controversy, Washington University students have already begun to move into the new space, which comes equipped with a student lounge club, rooftop pool and yoga room, among other amenities.

One such student is Zach Polsky, a senior at Washington University who moved into Everly the Loop early, arriving on August 1. He explained the main draws to living at Everly for him, citing convenience and affordability as factors that led him to choose the Everly.

“I decided to live [at the Everly] because it’s sort of close to campus, and it’s basically the same price as the Lofts—and a lot nicer,” Polsky said.

When asked about his opinions on the controversy over Everly and whether he thought the apartment could accelerate gentrification in the area, Polsky remained neutral.

“I can definitely understand how [gentrification] would be a concern,” Polsky said, “I know [the Everly’s] not really a scam for anything, but I can see how that would be a problem.”

Stuart P. Keating, an alumnus of the Washington University Law School, had especially strong feelings about gentrification and students living at the Everly, and he noted that he was not surprised about how spaces at the Everly have been filling up.

“I lived in the Skinker-DeBaliviere [neighborhood] for 5 years,” Keating said, “I’m not surprised that students are moving in. I don’t expect them to have any consideration for their impact on the character of the communities surrounding Wash. U.’s campus.”

Although opinions regarding the location have been mixed, Everly on the Loop has been increasing in occupancy as more Washington University students return for the school year and move into the apartments.

“It’s pretty busy,” Polsky said, “It’s pretty full.”

Officials from Everly on the Loop could not be reached for comment at the time of publication.

  • n’importe qui

    Polsky’s comment about Everly not being a scam doesn’t make sense. What is the connection between running scams and gentrification? Is there a larger context that this conversation fits into or does Polsky just have an understanding of gentrification that significantly different from an academic definition?