Chicago race rally canceled after venue search falls short

| Assignment Editor

Senior Class President Fernando Cutz told the student body in an e-mail this week that a Chicago rally, planned in response to the recent incident of alleged racial discrimination against six students at the Original Mothers bar in Chicago, will no longer occur.

“[We] worked for a while with the city of Chicago so that they could do it in the streets, and that was not working out,” Cutz wrote.

Cutz said that students could not find a location for the rally after 12 days of searching. Students planning the event originally wanted the rally to be in the streets, but a street rally would have taken over four weeks for Chicago authorities to approve and would also have required insurance. Students also looked into hosting the rally in Grant Park, but encountered similar prohibitive regulations.

Students then considered hosting the rally at a private venue and worked with Northwestern University’s student body vice president to accomplish this. But these plans were cancelled when Northwestern reallocated the event’s funding to another event addressing the issue of two Northwestern students who dressed up in blackface for Halloween.

Cutz emphasized that the rally’s cancellation does not mean that students are giving up or taking less of a stand on issues of race discrimination.

“It is very disappointing [that the rally is not happening], but at the same time, I hope that our efforts will continue,” Cutz said in an interview. “We have done a phenomenal job of promoting a dialogue not only with the University community but also with the St. Louis and the Chicago communities and really across the nation [and] across the world.”

Cutz also encouraged students to continue the dialogue about race discrimination that has been started on campus.

“We should take it upon ourselves as individuals to keep this dialogue going [and] to keep this dialogue going to keep these issues on the forefront of our minds and to really address social justice issues and diversity and discrimination issues the best that we can as individuals,“ Cutz said.