WUStock 2018: Timeflies when you’re having fun

Kos Sarfo | Contributing Writer

I’ll paint you a picture:

The sky teases at a sunset, but the sun still hangs high—it’s been a long day of activities like recovering from last night’s shenanigans, procrastinating studying for an exam or stopping by the Swamp to join a sparse, yet passionate crowd to support the many student bands performing this year. The air is still nippy despite the shining sun overhead, serving as a painful reminder that spring is not yet for the denizens of Washington University.

Cal Shapiro of indie band Timeflies reaches out into the crowd at WUStock 2018, hosted by Congress of the South 40 on the Swamp. Shapiro and bandmate Rob Resnick are known for their popular original songs like “Once in a While” and “Worse Things Than Love,” as well as YouTube covers.Jiyoon Kang | Student Life

Cal Shapiro of indie band Timeflies reaches out into the crowd at WUStock 2018, hosted by Congress of the South 40 on the Swamp. Shapiro and bandmate Rob Resnick are known for their popular original songs like “Once in a While” and “Worse Things Than Love,” as well as YouTube covers.

As 4 p.m. approaches, the crowd around the stage gets denser, and the mild chatter soon becomes intense cheering as the headline band takes the stage. On Saturday, April 7, the band Timeflies performed at the Congress of the South 40’s annual WUStock festival. Headed by Tufts University graduates Caleb Shapiro and Rob Resnick, Timeflies brought summer to an audience who hasn’t seen temperatures above 75 degrees since before the resurrection of Whispers Cafe.

And what a nice summer they brought—their music was inviting, friendly and un-intimidating to uninitiated ears. In other words, they were easy to get into, easy to enjoy and easy on the ears.

Student band The Snapchettes performs at WUStock. The Snapchettes were one of three student groups to open for Timeflies.Jiyoon Kang | Student Life

Student band The Snapchettes performs at WUStock. The Snapchettes were one of three student groups to open for Timeflies.

It’s the kind of music that takes you on a drive to meet up with your high school friends in June, the kind that plays over the white noise of your car’s AC. This was reflected in the audience where people were simply having fun—nodding their heads to the beat, swirling around on the grass with significant others, snacking on some delicious Vincent Van Doughnuts. No matter what they were doing, everyone had a smile on their face. Nobody appeared to have the need to “enjoy” the music more than anyone else there, and the band did their part to good-naturedly engage the audience from time to time.

Their music ranged from bouncy, rave-type beats to light-hearted, humorous rap, but it overall remained firmly in the genre of pop. The band itself has garnered a near-cult following on YouTube in particular, where the band uploads covers, remixes and, on Tuesdays, a series of videos called “Timeflies Tuesday,” in which they riff on and modulate a popular song.

Timeflies performs at WUStock.Jiyoon Kang | Student Life

Timeflies performs at WUStock.

Their music was an homage to a college experience that is shared by many, a departure from narratives of lavish lifestyles and hyper-specific experiences that can make some music seem rather alienating (even if they are bangers).

In short: Timeflies served as a refreshing departure from, yet celebration of, the trappings of almost-adult life. Truly, they were a welcome presence on our campus.